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Ck Challenge #2


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#1 Marlene

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 12:18 PM

Let's use this thread to work on CK challenge #2
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#2 Dianne

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 01:27 PM

Great. But...but...what is it?

#3 Jake

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 01:45 PM

What about basics like oil, vinegar, etc?
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#4 Marlene

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 02:36 PM

Great. But...but...what is it?


I put the link in the thread above. :D

What about basics like oil, vinegar, etc?

Nothing but spices.
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#5 James

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 09:01 PM

I'll be looking or things I have never cooked, but I have tried many things, once or twice: brains, sweetbreads, pig tails, duck feet, haggis, head cheese, squid ink, cuttlefish, shark, and there is not a lot that I won't try. Monkfish liver may make the list, and botarga from Sicily. Or maybe I'll come to terms with beef cheeks, infested Spanish cheese, or fried insects. Oooooohhh :wacko:
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#6 Marlene

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 09:07 PM

I don't think I'll be going as far as brains or fried insects myself.

Oh and, btw. James helped me with this one. Jake will be responsible for the next challenge and then waht we would like to start is tagging others to come up with the challenge after that. Etc etc. If you're tagged, you don't have to accept, but think of it as fun. Everyone will be given plenty of time to think up their challenge. :D
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#7 Corgi Man

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 08:25 PM

I hope it’s okay, but since there was only one day left in the Cookbook Challenge and the new $50.00 dinner party challenge just started, I did them both at once. I chose my whole menu from the Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook and kept it under $50.00. It was a dinner for four. It was hard. I wound up buying a few brands of things that wouldn’t have been my 1st choice. Every dish was a recipe I’d never made before.

Cheese Straws was the appetizer.

Posted Image

The main course was Pork Loin Chops with Pear and Vidalia Pan Gravy, Sunday Collards and Blue Cheese Grits.

Posted Image

Dessert was a Lady Baltimore Cake.

Posted Image

ITEMS THAT OCCURRED in SEVERAL DISHES
Butter 1.5 lbs. 4.00 #1
Flour 1 lb 1.49 #1
Canola Oil 1.99 #1
Eggs 1.99 #1
Sugar 0.79 #1
Milk 0.79 #1
TOTAL $12.35

CHEESE STRAWS
Sharp Cheddar Cheese 6 oz 2.25 #1

PORK LOIN CHOPS
Pork Chops 8.56 #3
2 Pears 0.80 #4
Vidalia Onion 0.55 #4
Sherry Miniature 1.39 #5
Chicken Broth 1.49 #1
TOTAL 12.79

SUNDAY COLLARDS
Collard Greens 2.98 #4
Smoked Ham Hock 1.70 #3
TOTAL 4.68

BLUE CHEESE GRITS
Grits 1.99 #1
Blue Cheese 4 oz 1.56 #2
TOTAL 3.55

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE
Dried Apricots 6 oz 1.85 #2
Golden Raisins 6 oz 1.85 #2
Lemon 0.49 #4
Rum pint (cheap stuff) 3.49 #5
Walnuts 4.50 #2
Confectioners’ Sugar 0.99 #1
TOTAL 13.17

TOTAL of Totals 48.79


#1 Washington Market – an overstock discount market.
#2 International Groceries – everything Greek and dried fruits and cheeses
#3 Esposito’s Pork Shop – the butcher
#4 Stiles Vegetables and Fruits
#5 Manhattan Plaza Liquors

Avoiding my convenient over-priced Food Emporium was tricky for some of the items. But if I'd gone there, I would have gone over budget.

Oh, the wine we had cost more than the dinner! A bottle of Mumm's Napa and a bottle of Z.D. Pinot Noir.

Edited by Corgi Man, 29 April 2007 - 10:00 PM.

Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


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#8 Dianne

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 10:14 PM

Your dinner looks wonderful. What did you think of the pork chops and the cheese straws? They are both on my list to try.

#9 Corgi Man

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 11:28 PM

Your dinner looks wonderful. What did you think of the pork chops and the cheese straws? They are both on my list to try.


Thank you. I had a great time doing it.

I liked the cheese straws, but they are pretty familiar. You've probably had many cheese stick kind of snacks that are like them. But I did think they would make a great addition to a simple salad as an edible ornament. They are very quick to make, about 20 to 25 minutes. For this challenge I would have gone for a more substantial hor d'oeuvre had I not spent so much of the budget on the Lady Baltimore Cake - which by the way is fabulous! I saw the recipe and it screamed out to me, "Make me!" It has a texture like no other cake I've ever had. It has a regular cake batter with stiffened egg whites folded in, it suggests an Angel Food Cake but is so much more substantial with its finely chopped walnuts and that frosting with its chopped rum soaked dried apricots, golden raisins, and coarsely broken walnuts.

The pear and sweet onion pork chop I really, really liked, very unusual. I think it's important to have a sweet Vidalia onion or another variety of sweet onion for the combination with the pears to work. And it's relatively quick to make. Takes about 20 minutes for the whole thing. I wouldn't cook it well done in the oven. Mine was perfect and juicy at 3 minutes in the oven.

I tried another one of the Lee Bros. appetizers a couple of days ago and it was a big, big hit. The spicy pecans. I think if I ever made them for a party I would do two versions, one exactly as the recipe is (it has a slow inexorable burn) and one with reduced or no cayenne as they suggested for a variation.
Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


Lionel Bart - OLIVER!

#10 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 06:57 AM

That meal looks great, Skip! Can you explain why the cake is called a Lady Baltimore Cake?

And Marlene, Challenge #2 looks like a lot of fun. I think I'm going to wait until after the move to do it, though, since there are a lot more options for non-supermarket shopping in Guelph than here. :D
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#11 Marlene

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 08:11 AM

That's ok Matthew. Given my schedule between now and when we leave, I may have to wait till we get back as well. Maybe I'll make it as my first meal at the cottage.
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#12 Corgi Man

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 08:55 AM

That meal looks great, Skip! Can you explain why the cake is called a Lady Baltimore Cake?



Thank you, Matthew. I'm going to quote the Lee Bros' book here to answer your question.

"Imagine that you are a novelist and a cake recipe you invent for your magnum opus becomes known world-wide and is baked by thousands of people for centuries, while the novel, though successful upon publication, fades into memory. Owen Wister is that novelist. In Lady Baltimore, set in Charleston in the years just after the end of the Civil War, a character bakes the eponymous cake. Has anyone ever read Lady Baltimore? We'd wager that 99 percent of the people who make this cake have never even heard of the book."

I'd never heard of the book or the cake till I read the description and then I really wanted to make one. The next time I do one I might even make a half-recipe one layer cake because the recipe as is makes one whopping-big cake that would easily serve 12 generously
and 16 modestly (and calorically responsibly).

I want to thank Malawry for making me aware of the Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook.

Edited by Corgi Man, 30 April 2007 - 09:11 AM.

Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


Lionel Bart - OLIVER!

#13 Guest_dave solomon_*

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 09:51 AM

I'm not sure how this can be considered a challenge - if you're living on food stamps you get somewhere around $21 per person to eat for the week. Oh noes! Only fifty dollars for dinner! The horror!

I've got no issue with spending a ton of cash on ingredients - I go through more than my fair share of expensive ingredients, but I don't pretend it's difficult to make a meal for $20, never mind $50.

I'll wander down to the market down the block and see about this challenge for dinner.

Incidentally, here's a ny times article about a $21/week food budget.

Edited by dave solomon, 01 May 2007 - 09:53 AM.


#14 Corgi Man

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 10:19 AM

I'm not sure how this can be considered a challenge - if you're living on food stamps you get somewhere around $21 per person to eat for the week. Oh noes! Only fifty dollars for dinner! The horror!

I've got no issue with spending a ton of cash on ingredients - I go through more than my fair share of expensive ingredients, but I don't pretend it's difficult to make a meal for $20, never mind $50.


Dave, I can put together a multi-course dinner a lot cheaper than I did. A lot cheaper. And almost every day I do, albeit with out appetizer and dessert, but usually a salad. But I took this challenge more as putting together an entertainment dinner for 4 that I could take some pride in, learn from and be interesting for my guests. And there is the part of the challenge that is making some recipes you haven't made before. If you count the ingredients that I had to buy to make the dishes and I didn't use the whole quantity, I've got stuff left over for other meals. I've been using left over walnuts, raisins, apricots, grits, eggs, canola oil, flour, etc. And I'll bet if I were able to adjust for only what I really used (not allowed in the challenge) my meal would have been between 30 to 35 dollars.

Edited by Corgi Man, 01 May 2007 - 10:30 AM.

Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


Lionel Bart - OLIVER!

#15 Marlene

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 12:03 PM

I'm not sure how this can be considered a challenge - if you're living on food stamps you get somewhere around $21 per person to eat for the week. Oh noes! Only fifty dollars for dinner! The horror!

I've got no issue with spending a ton of cash on ingredients - I go through more than my fair share of expensive ingredients, but I don't pretend it's difficult to make a meal for $20, never mind $50.

I'll wander down to the market down the block and see about this challenge for dinner.

Incidentally, here's a ny times article about a $21/week food budget.



it's meant to be in fun Dave. There's certainly no requirement for you to participate. <_<
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#16 Guest_dave solomon_*

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Posted 02 May 2007 - 11:58 AM

I think our dinner last night fits the challenge. We spent $12 at an Asian market down the street, herbs (cilantro, mint, and shiso) came from our garden. Since we've got a dozen fish left from last fishing season, that's what we used (similar fish was $3/lb still swimming at the market).

We made four Vietnamese dishes - two for the first time and two we've made in the past:

We started with nom du du (green papaya salad) made with shredded papaya, Vietnamese beef jerky, cilantro, and a spicy fish sauce/lime based dressing.
Posted Image

Bun cha ca Hanoi (fish over rice noodles, peanuts, herbs, and scallions). The fresh rice noodles looked good at the market, but they were too thick for this dish - next time it'll be rice vermicelli.
Posted Image

Bo Luc Lac (seared beef over watercress with sauteed onions with a garlic glaze, pepper/lime dipping sauce)
Posted Image

Dua Kem Caramen (coconut creme caramel)
Posted Image

The nom and bo luc lac we'd made before, the bun cha ca and coconut creme caramel are both new. A handful of things were more expensive than they needed to be - the fresh rice noodles were $2, dried ones cost under a buck. A few others were surprisingly cheap - 10 cents for a bunch of scallions, 59 cents for a bunch of watercress. The bo luc lac used flat iron steak, one of the great under-appreciated cuts of beef ($4 and change for a pound). I love this market, but I think if we got some of the produce at one of the Mexican bodegas nearby we'd have saved a few bucks.

#17 Jake

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 08:15 AM

Dave, that looks great! I'd love your recipe for nom du du (mine doesn't use jerky....) and the bo luc lac.
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#18 James

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 10:16 PM

There is co-incidentally a Paella cook-off challenge just getting underway on eGullet. In the cooking forum. I wouldn't mention this, except that the second post is a wonderfully detailed description of paella Valenciana, from a mother's recipe.
The paella is wood fired, and the saffron is toasted over wood fire. These two things, plus the possible inclusion
of salt cod (forget the snails :o ) may influence what I do with this. It is more peasant oriented than I anticipated, and I'm all for going back, just for a day.
"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
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#19 James

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Posted 21 June 2007 - 08:56 AM

Let's use this thread to work on CK challenge #2

There is about a week to complete this challenge, and only two meals are posted :o

Mine is not here either, but I can no longer beg off, "too busy". I'll be off to Soon Lee, a full-service Asian store today, to look for ingredients. Things are fairly inexpensive there, so I may bend the rules and add a modest bottle of wine (cellared, purchased under $20) to get up to $50.
"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
-Mrs. Bridges, in Upstairs Downstairs

#20 Marlene

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Posted 21 June 2007 - 12:42 PM

I've just had no time, what with being away and then getting ready for the move to the cottage. I may try to complete this one next week. Meantime, Jake will be in charge of posting our next challenge which should begin July 1.
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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.




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