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Chanukah/Hannukah/Christmas


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#41 Corgi Man

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 12:46 PM

Gordon, I'm with you! As the number of people here Christmas day has just gone up to 10 it will be paper and plastic service here, too. I don't have enough service ware for 10 and even if I did I wouldn't want to do all those dishes after I will have done all the cooking and pre-cleaning.

With so many dishes that you're preparing (and so many that I don't know what they are!), is this a buffet? Seems like a lot of things to serve at the table for each course.

My own menu's still in flux. Better make up my mind. Tomorrow's really the last day for practical and civilized shopping.

Edited by Corgi Man, 21 December 2007 - 01:34 PM.

Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


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#42 Guest_Gordon_*

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 02:38 PM

Gordon, I'm with you! As the number of people here Christmas day has just gone up to 10 it will be paper and plastic service here, too. I don't have enough service ware for 10 and even if I did I wouldn't want to do all those dishes after I will have done all the cooking and pre-cleaning.

With so many dishes that you're preparing (and so many that I don't know what they are!), is this a buffet? Seems like a lot of things to serve at the table for each course.

My own menu's still in flux. Better make up my mind. Tomorrow's really the last day for practical and civilized shopping.


There is no way I'm washing that many dishes. I usually set up a bar in the living room along with the first courses (seafood) on my large coffee table. It encourages one to relax, have a drink, and stay out of the f%$king kitchen.

I set up my dining room table as a buffet and let people graze on the korean food. I break that down and serve the second wave after about an hour and a half (tenderloin, etc). Desserts are added almost immediately as many fill up on the Korean food and forego the basic stuff. I spend most of the night in the kitchen popping my head out every know and then.

#43 Dianne

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 03:32 PM

Wow Gorden, what a spread. I hope there will be pictures.

#44 Dana

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 02:08 AM

You hoo, Gordon, pictures?!?!?! That sounds great, but it sure sounds like a whole lot of work.

I somehow didn't manage to get pics of most of our dinner, but I did get one of the rolls I made.

Posted Image

These are from an Emeril recipe from TVFN. It was very easy and very good, The recipes' comments indicated that they were very sweet (common in Cajun breads), so I did cut back on the sugar, and that they really were too large - the recipe called for them to be cloverleaf, so I just put 2 balls into the muffin tins instead of 3. Glad I did - they would have been too large. They were big enough as it was!!
Got a shot of dessert - creme brulee'.

Posted Image

I ventured to the hardware store on Christmas eve for a proper blow torch. My son had gotten me one of the small ones a couple of years ago, but they really are too tedious for more than one dessert at a time.
I still need more practice, tho. Not as browned as I like. Steve said he thinks he can bend the nozzel to get a better angle - the torch went out a couple of times because I tilted it up too much.
It's always something. :huh:
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Leslie, I will never forget you.

#45 Guest_Gordon_*

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Posted 28 December 2007 - 01:29 PM

No Pictures :( I can't find my lousy camera charger.

#46 Marlene

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Posted 19 November 2008 - 10:46 PM

While I realize our American friends still need to celebrate Thanksgiving before turning thoughts to Christmas, I have a question. Is it too late to start a fruitcake for this Christmas? Matthew, did you ever share your fruitcake recipe??
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#47 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 08:42 AM

Well, it took some poking around the site to find it, but yes, I did add it to the recipe section: here ya go!

And no, by no means is it too late to start; we started ours on Monday.

Edited by Matthew Kayahara, 20 November 2008 - 08:43 AM.

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#48 Marlene

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 08:46 AM

I swear I looked in the cakes and pie section yesterday!

Thanks!
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#49 Marlene

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 09:03 AM

Ok, another question. If I start today, I could get these baked before I leave next Friday. We'll be gone for 11 days. Do I store them wrapped on the counter or in the fridge?
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#50 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 09:09 AM

As a general rule, we store ours in the fridge.
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#51 Marlene

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 09:28 AM

self rising flour = cake flour?
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#52 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 09:50 AM

No, self rising flour is a mix of flour, baking powder and salt. You can buy it that way, or you make it yourself by using about 1.5 tsp. of baking powder per cup of flour. Just make sure you add some salt to the recipe as well.
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#53 Marlene

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 12:34 PM

Ok, I have dried cherries (boy those were expensive!), dried cranberries, both kinds of raisins and some sort of dried pinapple although they look sort of sugar coated to me. The only candied peel available was a mix of lemon and orange. Think that will work?

I have no intention of using dried prunes or dates. :D
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#54 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 12:47 PM

Ok, I have dried cherries (boy those were expensive!), dried cranberries, both kinds of raisins and some sort of dried pinapple although they look sort of sugar coated to me. The only candied peel available was a mix of lemon and orange. Think that will work?

Yes, dried cherries are pricey. Yes, the pineapple we used is highly sweetened. For the peel, a mix of lemon and orange should be fine. As long as it's real candied peel and not the faux stuff you find in the baking aisle at the grocery store - which is actually flavoured rutabaga! :o

I have no intention of using dried prunes or dates. :D

Well, there's no dates in the recipe, so that shouldn't be a problem. :P I assume you're skipping the figs too, though... Really, I think the variety of fruit, while nice, is secondary to the quantity, so I'd just bump up the other ingredients.

I should probably also note that we use a half-and-half mixture of brandy and cherry brandy in the booze section, but I don't think you can get good cherry brandy (namely, Cherry Marnier or Cherry Heering) in Ontario, so I'd just go with the regular brandy. Also, Grand Marnier will work in place of Cointreau, if you prefer.
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#55 Marlene

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 12:52 PM

Well it says it is orange and lemon peel!

Correct, no figs. :D

I have luxardo, should I use some of that?
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#56 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 01:11 PM

Luxardo maraschino? No, I'd stay away from that; I'd think it would be too funky. The cherry brandy we use tastes like sour cherry syrup, only alcoholic.
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#57 Marlene

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 01:14 PM

Ok, I'll go see what we have at the bar downstairs. White rum? It doesn't specify.
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#58 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 01:16 PM

Man, I did great job transcribing this recipe, didn't I? We use dark rum. This year, we used a combination of Mount Gay and Gosling's Black Seal.

And we usually use ruby port, though I'm sure tawny would be fine, if that's what you have on hand.
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"A pot saver is a self-hampering cook. Use all the pans, bowls, and equipment you need, but soak them in water as soon as you are through with them. Clean up after yourself frequently to avoid confusion."
-Julia Child, Mastering the Art of French Cooking

#59 Marlene

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 01:20 PM

:D I just used an amber rum and I think the port was tawny.

Ok, I think I can manage now, thanks! :D
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#60 Marlene

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Posted 20 November 2008 - 01:47 PM

I also used Regan's bitters. I must say it smells wonderful simmering away on the stove!

just realized there's no icing on this. Is that traditional?
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