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#21 Marlene

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Posted 17 December 2006 - 02:57 PM

It does look great. Now I have to go find the Dec issue of Gourmet!
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#22 Marlene

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 09:18 PM

grrr.! Not an issue of the Dec Gourmet anywhere and mine hasn't arrived yet!
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#23 Marlene

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 05:54 PM

I'm back, and I'm cookin. :D We celebrated my new kitchen on Christmas eve with a beef fondue. I marinaded tenderloin cubes in soy, worchestershire and garlic for a few hours. We used canola oil for the fondue. I bought most of the dipping sauces, but I did make the bernaise sauce that my son has been asking for. I roasted some parisianne potatoes in goose fat and we had some celery and carrot sticks to munch on as well:

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Christmas Day itself was just hubby and I so I roasted a small (9 lb) turkey for us. Hubby made the stuffing.
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#24 Marlene

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 06:06 PM

Yesterday was the first of two prime rib dinners. I had a 13 lb prime rib, with a beautiful fat cap.

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I brush the roast with EVOO, and dust with kosher salt and some black pepper:
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Into a 300 degree convection oven for approximately 18 minutes per pound, but I use a thermometer and take the roast out when it hits 120:
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I roasted potatoes with the roast:
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And sauteed green beans in a mustard garlic butter. Made Yorkshire puddings,
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And put them in the middle of this bread wreath the bakery made for me that morning:

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The Christmas table:
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Slice of beef,
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Plated, with and without gravy. I also made horseradish creme:
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Seasoned with the world's largest pepper mill. (my husband and son's idea of a joke gift to me)
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Dessert was a chocolate butter cream yule log that the bakery made for me as well:
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#25 Dana

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 02:54 AM

Marlene, that looks great as usual. Those potatoes are making my mouth water!!! Our dinner was terrific, even though my hubby put the roast on an hour before I wanted him to. It just got a good, long rest, and everything was fine. For my seafood appetizer trio, I ended up with tuna tartare (Barefoot Contessa), and seared scallop (only one as they were 2-3 inches in diameter!!) with an herb mayo, and a simple boiled shrimp with cocktail sauce. One thing I should have done though, was rest the scallops on paper towels for a couple of minutes. They exuded some juice and messed up my sauce. They still tasted ok, but didn't look as nice as I wanted them to. I'll post some pics soon.
I have a 'creme brulee' torch, and it's really more hassle than it's worth because it's so small. Broiling them makes them hot all the way through, so I think I need a blow torch from the hardware store. Anyone else use one of them?
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#26 Marlene

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Posted 30 December 2006 - 09:37 AM

I made the noodle torte and it is just delicious. I strongly recommend it for your vegetarian guest, Marlene.

It is in the Dec/06 issue of Gourmet. I used kale instead of chard, but if neither is your thing, it would be great with spinach.

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Don't use the spring form pan they call for. The filling is very runny before it is baked. I used a gratin dish and got neat slices for serving. It reheats well.



I'll upload pictures later, but I made this for my vegetarian guest last night and it was a big hit!
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#27 Marlene

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Posted 01 January 2007 - 09:28 AM

Our second Christmas Prime Rib dinner. I wasn't nearly as happy with this roast as the fat cap was almost non existent. The roast was a last minute purchase from Whole Foods, since for various reasons, I had forgotten to take out the roast from Cumbrae's I have sitting in my freezer. It still turned out quite well and was really tasty. but not as tasty as that 7 week aged roast that I expected to cook!

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With it, I served glazed carrots, sauteed green beans and a cheese and chive potato puff:
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And the vegetarian torte was a huge success. I used spinach in this:
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#28 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 09:12 PM

I have a 'creme brulee' torch, and it's really more hassle than it's worth because it's so small. Broiling them makes them hot all the way through, so I think I need a blow torch from the hardware store. Anyone else use one of them?


Yes! I have a hardware-store model, and it works beautifully. My only complaint - and it's really a minor quibble - is that the dial controlling the flame tends to slip, especially towards the lower end. But it seemed like the best available model with a built-in igniter.

Funny story, though: my friend was sold the exact same torch (in different colours) by a kitchenware store, with the packaging copy all geared towards kitchen use - for about 4 times the price.
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#29 Marlene

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Posted 04 January 2007 - 09:30 PM

Matthew, welcome back!

I have a kitchen torch ( a small one) and while it took some getting used to, I don't have any problems with it now. Maybe I should check out the hardware store ones!
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#30 Marlene

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 08:34 AM

We are having Christmas early this year as we fly out on Wed to begin our Christmas vacation. I'm rather afraid that this year's dinner is going to look much like last year's. Think of it as Christmas tradition, much like turkey is for Thanksgiving. :D

Yesterday, I made croutons and the filling for the tourtiere nibbles. I was really happy with the croutons. Usually I toss the bread cubes with a mix of olive oil, butter and garlic and just bake them. I've tried straight deep frying but found that the garlic burned. I've never been completely happy with the results of straight baking but they weren't bad. This time, I did the usual toss and bake, but then also deep fried them after they had baked for 15 minutes. I had the oil leftover from the french fries the other night, or I probably wouldn't have bothered. These are the best ever. The baking step allowed the butter oil and garlic to absorb into the bread, while the deep frying crisped them right up without burning as they only needed a few seconds in the oil.

I used the leftover french bread I made the other day for the croutons.
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Wonton cups are about to go into the oven. This morning, I'll make the bacon bits and dressing for the salad and get the table set. The lad arrives at noon and we'll open presents and guests will arrive at 5 (those who can make it through the snow). I've just noticed my camera lens seems to have a smudge on it. I'll just go fix that. :blink:

In the meantime, I'm off to fill stockings.

Ho Ho Ho. :D
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#31 Marlene

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 04:26 PM

I think I"m ready. The roast is going into the oven in 20 minutes. The tourtiere filling is reheating in the toaster oven. The yorkshire batter is made and resting. The dressing, croutons and bacon bits are ready for the salad.

Carrots are cut and holding in water. The table is set, and most importantly, I'm having a drink. :D
Rum and eggnog for the festive season. We'll open champagne when people get here to go with the nibbles of tourtiere bites and brie en croute. The only thing I won't be making is the dessert which came from our fabulous bakery around the corner.

The weather sucks. It's been snowing and blowing all day, and it is still snowing here.
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#32 Marlene

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 10:38 PM

And so it is Christmas. Well sort of. For us. The seasons turn, and family members pass on. Celebrating without them can be painful at first and so, sometimes new traditions are born, while holding fast to some of the old traditions help remember those loved ones and the wonderful times shared together.

This is my first Christmas without my family which pretty much consisted of my brother and my mom who passed away within six months of each other last year. Last Christmas, my mother spend the entire season in the hospital. My brother had already passed on. To be here, and not to be able to cook for them was more than I was willing to stand this year, and so we had Christmas early, so we could be elsewhere this year. This is the first year I have ever been away from home for Christmas, and the first, that I have not had an extended family to cook for. So a new tradition, of not being here on the actual day, and an old tradition of serving the family favourites for an early Christmas dinner. I can assure you, I would have been drawn and quartered by my family had I ever served anything but Prime Rib for Christmas dinner. :D

Our Christmas table


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We begin with some nibbles.

Tourtiere nibbles in wonton cups with dijon dab
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Brie en croute with cranberry chutney
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The beef
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The yorkshires
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Carrots
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Roasted potatoes
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Ceasar salad
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Plated
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And with gravy!
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And dessert was special coffees
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And a chocolate yule log
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My kitchen is a disaster, but everyone is well fed, and sleepy. All is good. :)
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#33 Corgi Man

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Posted 16 December 2007 - 10:57 PM

A really, really gorgeous festive meal, Marlene. Best wishes to you and yours for Christmas and in the New Year.
Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
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#34 Dianne

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 09:14 AM

Absolutely beautiful, Marlene. Have a good holiday. Maybe next year you will find yourself celebrating at the cottage. I bet it is wonderful with all this fresh snow.

#35 Marlene

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 09:39 AM

It's a thought, Dianne, and one we're talking about. At least maybe going up Boxing Day and staying for a week. Based on these pics, not only would we need snowmobiles, but we wouldn't be running out for too many groceries!
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#36 Madge

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 12:20 PM

Marlene your dinner looks wonderful. Yes, it is difficult when you no longer have the traditions of family. After my Mother, Father and brother died I had to become accustom to an entirely different celebration. Now it is in New Brunswick with more people coming and going than I could ever imagine.
Our Christmas celebration with friends on Sat. was really fun despite the weather and 3 cancels. The crown roast of pork stuffed with apple fennel dressing, brussel sprouts with pancetta, thyme and shallots, cider bourbon gravy (all from Dec. FC) was great. I also made Twice Baked Rice which is my no fail rice recipe and can be made a few days ahead. It was posted on the old Food Muvment by ??Persimmon I think. It always gets great reviews. Lots of martinis, wine and laughs.

#37 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 01:32 PM

Everything looks really lovely, Marlene. Merry Christmas!
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#38 Guest_rocler_*

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 02:08 PM

Marlene: I hope you have a nice Christmas, and with new traditions you may enjoy it more than what you think.

being the only girl, and with my hubby being the oldest in his family, christmas was always done here at our home. Last year my son had a daughter and didnt want to drag her out Christmas day (and rightly so), the new tradition is being celebrated at his home with my daughters in laws immidate family, and it was quite nice, different and this is how we will be celebrating from now on. sometimes change is good and enjoyable :D and alot less work for me :lol:

#39 Dianne

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 02:45 PM

different and this is how we will be celebrating from now on. sometimes change is good and enjoyable :D and alot less work for me :lol:


And that's the truth!! This year we go to our daughter's for Christmas, and our son's for Boxing Day, and our house is an oasis of calm. I love it.

#40 Guest_Gordon_*

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Posted 21 December 2007 - 12:14 PM

Whole family at my house on Xmas eve.

Shrimp Cocktail
Oysters Rockafella (new style)
Fried Calamari
Crudite

Then

Bulgogi
Chop-Che
Jajamyun
Spicy cabbage salad
Cucumber Kim-Chee
Whole Steamed Fish in black bean sauce
pan chan

Then

Whole Tenderloin of Beef
Baked Ham
Roasted Veggies (Beets, Sunchokes, Carrots, Parsnips)
Creamed Spinach
Corn bread

Then

Cookie tray and a Buche Noel to end (bakery provided)

Whites -
05 Fevre Chablis
Nigl Gruner Veltliner
Feudi San Gregorio Fiano di Avellino

Reds
Ogier La Rosine
Chave Mon Coeur
Rosemount Balmoral

94 Quinto du Noval
Kracher #7 and #13

Wines provided are in plain view - what I may choose to drink in the kitchen is my own business :D


paper plates and plastic forks mandatory

Edited by Gordon, 21 December 2007 - 12:15 PM.





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