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French Fries


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#21 Marlene

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 08:53 PM

Fries, soaked in water for an hour, then twice fried.

Posted Image
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#22 Guest_rocler_*

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 10:08 PM

i order my potatoes already peeled, so they come in friday and are put in buckets of water and used over the weekend as we dont have delivery again till Tuesdays. Being in the cold water doesnt hurt, although i do admit to doing a daily temperature check morning and late afternoon.

#23 kim shook

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 07:35 PM

I made twice cooked fries this past Friday. I used russets and cut them with my handy-dandy new cutter:
Posted Image
Which I just love. It comes with two cutting plates – one skinny like McD’s and the other large, which is the one that I like. I soaked them in water for a couple of hours, rinsed dried and then cooked at 325 degrees in my deep fryer to this point:
Posted Image

Then when they had drained, I put them on a ½ sheet pan and put them in the fridge. The next evening, just before serving, I fried them at 375 to this point:
Posted Image

They turned out very well – I tossed them with some Paula Deen’s house seasoning (salt, pepper, onion powder and garlic powder, I think) and a touch of cayenne.

I think that the next time, I’ll try the first fry at a lower temperature, as Skip does.

#24 Marlene

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 08:31 PM

Very nice Kim, and I have that exact same cutter! I do my first fry at 330 and it seems to work ok.
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#25 Guest_dave solomon_*

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:09 PM

Sorry folks, the fries are frozen. :rolleyes:


I'm sure you're going to take this as an insult even though that isn't how I mean it, but those fries look significantly better than your usual fries.

#26 Marlene

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:14 PM

I'm sure you're going to take this as an insult even though that isn't how I mean it, but those fries look significantly better than your usual fries.



Great. I'll stick to frozen from now on!
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#27 Guest_dave solomon_*

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:19 PM

Great. I'll stick to frozen from now on!


You'd be surprised how many high end restaurants use frozen fries for their moules frites/steak frites...

#28 Marlene

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:22 PM

What's wrong with my homemade ones? Seriously. If I can do something to improve them, great. Funny, Don said tonight that it was clear these weren't homemade because they were "boring". :D
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#29 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:30 PM

I've never, but never, been happy with my homemade fries. Now, I only ever eat them in restaurants, unless I'm feeling seriously lazy and cook frozen ones in the oven - an abomination, I know.
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#30 Guest_dave solomon_*

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:35 PM

What's wrong with my homemade ones? Seriously. If I can do something to improve them, great. Funny, Don said tonight that it was clear these weren't homemade because they were "boring". :D


You're using old potatoes. Homemade fries are only good when the sugar content in the potato is right, once too much starch converts to sugar the fries end up too dark and soggy.

#31 Corgi Man

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:36 PM

I don't much care for the frozen oven fries. I like the look of Marlene's homemade fries. So much so that I've been doing the double fry stuff lately for fries. The frozen fries tonight are so even in color that they look a bit synthetic to me compared to the real deal which has more variety.
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#32 Marlene

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:45 PM

You're using old potatoes. Homemade fries are only good when the sugar content in the potato is right, once too much starch converts to sugar the fries end up too dark and soggy.



No I don't think so. When I make french fries I use the potatoes the same day I buy them. Short of growing my own,(certainly not happening in the winter), it's as close as I get to fresh.

Besides, homemade fries get soaked so all the starch comes out anyway. And perhaps it looks like it in my pics, but the homemade ones are not soggy.
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#33 Guest_dave solomon_*

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 08:59 PM

No I don't think so. When I make french fries I use the potatoes the same day I buy them. Short of growing my own,(certainly not happening in the winter), it's as close as I get to fresh.

Besides, homemade fries get soaked so all the starch comes out anyway. And perhaps it looks like it in my pics, but the homemade ones are not soggy.


It's the sugar that's the problem, starch converts to sugar while the potatoes are in storage. Potatoes only make good french fries and potato chips for a couple of months after they're harvested. It doesn't matter if you bring your fryer with you to the grocery store, old potatoes are old potatoes.

#34 James

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 09:15 PM

The only frozen ones I like are Cavendish (P.E.I., used in poutine at Costco). It's the beefy flavored coating I confess to like, but I have never bought a bag for home. There is little or no flavor in frozen fries, and it is easy for me to carve up one or two large russets or Yukons, and fry in a shallow pan. They come out crispy, golden, and with a real potato flavor.
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#35 Guest_rocler_*

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 09:31 PM

ok, im weighting in on this one, you want old potatoes to make fries, not new potatoes. new potatoes dont brown, they stay hard.

If my supplier, makes an error and hasnt bought enough potatoes around september the new ones are all we can use and the fries are disgusting. We use Red jumbos for fries.

Edited by rocler, 02 March 2009 - 09:50 PM.


#36 James

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 10:06 PM

ok, im weighting in on this one, you want old potatoes to make fries, not new potatoes. new potatoes dont brown, they stay hard.

If my supplier, makes an error and hasnt bought enough potatoes around september the new ones are all we can use and the fries are disgusting. We use Red jumbos for fries.

I'm with rocler on this one. Dave could actually be wrong :P
When I worked in a Kawartha's chip truck we hated the new season potatoes, which were too small and didn't develop the right flavor. We would order in large russets from Idaho, peel and cut them, hold them in water overnight, and double fry. (I won't double fry at home because it is not necessary.)
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#37 Guest_dave solomon_*

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 02:35 AM

I'm with rocler on this one. Dave could actually be wrong :P
When I worked in a Kawartha's chip truck we hated the new season potatoes, which were too small and didn't develop the right flavor. We would order in large russets from Idaho, peel and cut them, hold them in water overnight, and double fry. (I won't double fry at home because it is not necessary.)


I've got no idea what they were sending you as 'new season potatoes' the size of the potato doesn't change after it's been harvested. Keller uses frozen fries at Bouchon for good reason. When good fresh Kennebec or Shepody potatoes are available, they're far better than frozen fries, but I'll take good frozen fries over old russets any day.

#38 James

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 09:28 AM

I'm appalled to learn that Keller uses frozen fries, with all the resources at his disposal.

I looked up Kennebec on the web, and learned that they are oval, no bumps, and thin skinned. Plus, they keep well in storage without the sugar conversion until the very end (but this is similar for russets).
I'll be looking for a bag of Kennebecs, as they should work well with my method of hand cutting, skin on, and pan frying a la Robuchon.
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#39 Guest_rocler_*

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 09:29 AM

from what I got from the article Keller uses frozen for convienience. In our area most the most popular potato that gets used for fries are Chieftain or to us "Quebec Jumbo Rouge". There is a difference between new and old potatoes, and you definatly dont want to be using new potatoes for fries

#40 Guest_dave solomon_*

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 10:57 AM

from what I got from the article Keller uses frozen for convienience. In our area most the most popular potato that gets used for fries are Chieftain or to us "Quebec Jumbo Rouge". There is a difference between new and old potatoes, and you definatly dont want to be using new potatoes for fries


There are small red potatoes sold all year as 'new potatoes' in grocery stores, they have little in common with the potatoes you'd want to use for french fries. From what you are posting it sounds like you believe that potatoes can be stored for more than a year and you would want to use potatoes from the previous year for french fries. As far as I know they can only be stored for up to 9 months. I think Keller uses frozen french fries at Bouchon for the same reason he uses farm raised salmon at the French Laundry, they are consistent throughout the year.




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