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#21 Corgi Man

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 04:16 PM

Marlene, double dipping is what I do normally. And it's in the method you asked me to write about in Fried Chicken. It produces a nice, full breading. And if you cook it at a good high temperature 350-375 it adheres beautifully and doesn't absorb a lot of oil.
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#22 Corgi Man

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 08:02 PM

Tonight I made the brined buttermilk fried chicken from Thomas Keller's recipe in the current Bon Appetit. It involves a lot more different spices than I usually use. Folks, it's to die for. Takes a little planning, but well worth it. My company loved it.

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Edited by Corgi Man, 01 September 2008 - 06:37 AM.

Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


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#23 James

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 08:12 PM

Can you paraphrase?
"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
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#24 James

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 08:54 AM

Can you paraphrase?

I found a paraphrase of Keller's buttermilk fried chicken recipe today, and it will soon be on my agenda, hopefully as good as Skip's :rolleyes:
Further down on the page is a link with the full (3 chicken) recipe. and a comparison to a simpler pan fried chicken.

Edited by James, 30 September 2008 - 09:16 AM.

"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
-Mrs. Bridges, in Upstairs Downstairs

#25 Marlene

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 10:13 AM

Michael also has a link to Keller's fried chicken recipe on his blog.

This is also something I want to try soon.
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#26 James

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Posted 30 September 2008 - 10:20 AM

I like that version as it is pan fried, rather than 12c oil. I don't think I've ever had bad chicken (fried or roasted whole) out of a 12" cast iron pan.
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#27 Marlene

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 06:40 AM

Jake and I made Keller's fried chicken last night.

Before frying, but after brining, legs and thighs
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Breasts. We did not do any wings. In fact, we bought the chicken pieces rather than cutting up our own chickens.
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We got two pots of oil going on the stove
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And produced this!
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Everyone but me loved this. I liked it, and certainly the flavour of the brine came through very clearly in the chicken itself. And that was the problem. There were far too many bay leaves in this for my taste and I would probably omit 2 of the three sprigs of rosemary next time. Both of those are very strong herbs and to me, they overpowered the chicken.


We had an awful lot of fun doing this though, and as Jake and I analyzed the whole thing later, we both think we might prefer our usual method of soaking in buttermilk and hot sauce first. Since Jake has vacation coming up shortly, we've agreed we are going to fry chicken again. One batch using Keller's method with less bay leaves and rosemary, and one with our usual buttermilk soak method.

We'll keep you posted. :D
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#28 Corgi Man

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 08:21 AM

Looks terrific, Marlene. I've done the Keller fried chicken twice and didn't love it. It was awfully good, but there seemed to be something "off" in the spice flavors for my palate. I went back to my own way which uses butter milk and egg and spiced flour for the batter stage and has a brine earlier of salt, pepper, paprika, garlic and cayenne or chipotle. It will be good to read your comparison.
Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


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#29 Marlene

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 08:51 AM

I honestly think it was the bay leaves Skip. 12 bay leaves is a lot! But everyone else, particularly, Don, loved it. I'd prefer a more subtle flavour in the brine and a little more kick to the spices so we will do some comparisons in the next week or so.
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#30 Corgi Man

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 09:47 AM

I've two different Keller recipes for fried chicken - one of them uses onion powder. I really don't like onion powder I've found. And that one with the onion powder had loads of red kick spices in it. It was published this last year in Bon Apetit.

Edited by Corgi Man, 26 July 2009 - 09:49 AM.

Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


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#31 Marlene

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Posted 26 July 2009 - 09:49 AM

There seem to be several of them out there. I'll be interested to see what version the Ad Hoc cookbook actually publishes when it comes out this fall.
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#32 Marlene

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 07:24 AM

We fried chicken last night again. To be precise, we fried 68 pieces of chicken. :D

When we did Keller's recipe for fried chicken a couple of weeks ago, those who read the posts know that I wasn't as happy with it as I could have been. I found the taste of the bay leaves and lemon somewhat over powering.

As Jake and I got to analysing what we did, we both mused on whether we would like buttermilk soaked better, and whether we would like Keller's better with a few minor changes to the brine. And so, we set out to fry 68 pieces of chicken. Some brined a la Keller, and some soaked in buttermilk and crystal hot sauce.

There are two recipes that I can find out there for Keller's chicken. One from Epicourious and one from Food and Wine. the recipes are similar, although one calls for 12 bay leaves and no double dipping and the Epicourious one calls for 18 bay leaves and double dipping the chicken.

The changes I made to Keller's brine this time included omitting the bay leaves entirely, reducing the lemon to one, and reducing the rosemary to 1 sprig. Everything else remained the same.

Last time we did this, we double dipped. This time we did not. More on that later.

This is what 68 pieces of fried chicken looks like. Pardon the mess in the background and the colour of some of these. I'm at the cottage and there is not a lot of room to work with here, so counter stuff gets in the pictures. And I still need a better camera or learn how to photoshop out the yellow and greens from the counter that the camera picks up. But you'll get the general idea. :D
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To the left, the brined, to the right, buttermilk soaked.

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Again, to the left, is the brined chicken, to the right, the buttermilk soaked. Or depending on how this is displaying on your screen, the top is the brined, the bottom, on the round plate, buttermilk.

The spices in both flour mixtures were similar. I used paprika in mine, while I am not certain Jake did. Both methods were brined/soaked overnight.

The crust on the buttermilk was lighter and crisper and while the breasts (shown here) were similar in colour, the legs and thighs of the brined chicken fried up quite a bit darker than the buttermilk chicken. You can see that in the two pans of chicken above.

The results? My son, Jake and I prefered the buttermilk chicken, while both our husband's preferred the brined chicken. Both Jake and I felt that the flavours of the brine again overpowered the chicken, so we didn't really get a proper taste of "fried chicken", while the buttermilk soak allowed the chicken to shine through. the brined chicken was certainly very moist and flavorful, and was very good, but we preferred the "simplicity" of the buttermilk.

As for double dipping, our husbands and myself prefer the double dipped method, while Jake did not. My son had no opinion on that one. Double dipping gives more crust and I like the crust the best on fried chicken. :D

It took us 2 and a half hours to fry 68 pieces of chicken. We were exhausted by the end of it, and there was oil everywhere. On the stove top/floor/us. While we enjoyed it immensely, I suspect it will be some time before we are ready to fry chicken again. :D
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#33 James

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 07:44 AM

I am puzzled by the yellow cast too. Looks like the Lumix processor is miscued. A stronger flash setting might help.

I have never had a color problem with my Canon SLR, now old at 4 years, as their Digic processors are good, also Nikon SLR.

I found an interesting clip of southern fried chicken, maybe Skip has tried this or had it served.

Marlene, what happens to all the leftovers!

Edited by James, 04 August 2009 - 07:54 AM.

"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
-Mrs. Bridges, in Upstairs Downstairs

#34 Corgi Man

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 08:22 AM

Marlene,

I see you came to similar conclusions that I did. The Keller method my company loved when I made it and said it was to die for. But I still prefer the method where I brine in a simpler group of spices, drain, dry, and dip in egg-buttermilk then toss in the spiced flour and fry. With that second method - if I double dip I actually get too much breading. Anyway - it's all good.
Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


Lionel Bart - OLIVER!

#35 Marlene

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 08:38 AM

James, we kept some leftovers for lunch today, and Jake took home leftovers for herself and hubby and one of their neighbours who has company up. I don't think it will go to waste!

Skip, I think that yes, if you are using egg, then double dipping would be too much, but just flour, buttermilk flour produces a great crust that isn't too bready. Please don't temp me to try the egg/buttermilk method. I think I'm fried out for the moment! :D
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#36 Dana

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 06:54 PM

What kind of oil did you use, Marlene? How did it stand up to that long fry time?
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#37 Marlene

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 07:52 PM

What kind of oil did you use, Marlene? How did it stand up to that long fry time?



the first time we did this a few weeks ago, we used peanut oil. Last night we used veg oil and it held up pretty well. We did need to add more oil about 3/4 of the way through, but I didn't see much degrading of the oil itself.
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#38 Corgi Man

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 08:11 PM

The degrading of the oil also has a lot to do with the temperature that you're frying at. Corn, canola, vegetable, peanut will all hold up pretty well in the 325-375 range.

Edited by Corgi Man, 04 August 2009 - 08:12 PM.

Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


Lionel Bart - OLIVER!

#39 Guest_snowangel_*

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 10:16 PM

Marlene, I'm curious as to which version made for better leftovers? You must have had a few, and oy, I can't imagine how much grease you slid on until the kitchen was cleaned up.

#40 Jake

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Posted 09 August 2009 - 07:29 PM

Marlene, I'm curious as to which version made for better leftovers? You must have had a few, and oy, I can't imagine how much grease you slid on until the kitchen was cleaned up.


I tried both the next day as leftovers, and while i still preferred the taste of the buttermilk, the brined were better the next day in my opinion. I didn't see any noticeable difference in texture or moisture.
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