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#1 James

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 10:12 AM

Fried Chicken deserves its own space, so here it is :D

We have discussed spicy-hot buttermilk soaks but I have never done anything other than a dip in seasoned flour with a bit of leavening. Some southern cooks just use flour, and fry in a cast iron skillet, turning once or twice.
I like rocler's spicy buttermilk soak, but I have never done anything like it as the chicken we get is already tender. Jake, what is the hot sauce like? Haven't seen it, but I have Frank's in the pantry. I don't use Tabasco any more, as the price is high and it is somewhat ascerbic :huh:
Skip, I'm so skeptical of brining (or anything) making white meat come out moist, but I'll definitely try it. I'm really a dark meat aficianado :)

Are there any batters (or oven coatings) for chicken parts that will withstand microwave reheating the next day?
I'm always looking for lunchroom ideas, and zapped Shake 'n Bake doesn't cut it <_<
"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
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#2 Corgi Man

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 10:47 AM

Are there any batters (or oven coatings) for chicken parts that will withstand microwave reheating the next day?
I'm always looking for lunchroom ideas, and zapped Shake 'n Bake doesn't cut it <_<


I haven't found any batter or breading that will be as crispy after refrigeration and microwave reheating as it was after its original frying. (Batters and double-dipped breading seem especially soggy to me on reheating.) But I will say that a buttermilk-egg and flour breading tastes awfully good the next day and isn't soggy. One book that I respect recommends any of the buttermilk soaks or dips combined with breading as some of the crispiest chicken you will ever get.

Storage I think is important for the cooked chicken. I put it cooled on paper towels in a covered container and I don't pile one piece on top of another so that moisture can accumulate between them. Why cooled? The hot chicken can create steam in the container moistening the breading. When I microwave them, I also do them uncovered so that the breading doesn't get steamed. It will still come out a softer, less crispy, breading, but some Southern fried chicken recipes aim for that. Just as long as it isn't soggy.

I do like long brining. It's not just about moisture, it's about flavoring the meat. I've had loads of fried chicken where I found the breading and skin really interesting and the meat itself rather dull, especially the white meat. (James, I, too, am a dark meat aficionado.) I also cut averaged-sized chicken breasts in two, and larger ones even in three so that they're more equal in size to the other chicken pieces and have more surface exposure for better brining.

Hormel has a page on its site about the benefits of chicken brining. Alas, I don't know how to do links.

Edited by Corgi Man, 03 April 2007 - 11:46 AM.

Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


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#3 Jake

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 12:34 PM

Like Corgi Man I am huge afficionado of brining and soaking chicken. It just makes for a tastier, juicier end result.

The Crystal Hot Sauce is a Louisiana product that I've been addicted to for about 15 years. It has more of a vinegar zing to it in my opinion and goes with everything!
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#4 Corgi Man

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 02:31 PM

I want to tell you about a cook book that I very much enjoy and think you might, too:

Fried Chicken - The World's Best Recipes from Memphis to Milan, From Buffalo to Bangkok

by Damon Lee Fowler - Broadway Books, New York


It has loads of Southern variations - some that we've already talked about - some that involve bourbon, lemon, and other interesting things in the soaking or brining stage. It has recipes from Asia, Europe, South America and of course North America. Not so much from Africa - because chicken is usually grilled there, and in rare instances where it is fried it's boiled first. He calls it a reverse fricassee.

He goes into the chemistry for the best crisping and adhesion of breading, etc.

There's a whole section on the traditional sides for fried chicken mostly from the South. But there are sauces and sides from all around the world.

Edited by Corgi Man, 03 April 2007 - 04:57 PM.

Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


Lionel Bart - OLIVER!

#5 Marlene

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Posted 03 April 2007 - 04:26 PM

Hmmm, I'll be around the corner from a fabulous cookbook store this weekend. I'll see if they have it.

Meanwhile, here's an amazon link to the book.
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#6 Marlene

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 04:20 PM

I did pick up this book, but haven't had a chance to look at it yet. In the meantime, I'm making fried chicken out of boneless chicken breasts tonight. Now, in many restaurants in the states, I've had Honey Fried chicken. I haven't been able to find a recipe for that. Anyone know how it's made?
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#7 Guest_rocler_*

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 08:20 PM

the few times i`ve made it its been with a milk and honey soak, and then dredging in flour, and deep frying.

#8 Guest_rocler_*

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 08:40 AM

I worked at a catering firm, and they par-boiled the chicken pieces, then put them in a milk honey soak then dredged in flour and spices. It makes a more golden color chicken as it doesnt stay as long in the oil frying and you couldnt tell it was par-boiled.

#9 Marlene

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 09:45 PM

I still haven't done honey fried chicken, but I did make sort of fried chicken and homemade french fries tonight.

These are boneless, skinless chicken breasts, because mostly I can't be bothered to cut up a chicken for two of us, who only eat white meat. And besides, these take a whole lot less time and mess that regular fried chicken. No overnight soak, just an hour in buttermilk and tabasco, then into some spiced flour and fried.

And I always peel my potatoes before making french fries. A small quibble of mine is that I can't stand the skin on my french fries. I never did take to that fast food outlet New York Fries for that reason. :D I'm not rally happy with the way my mandoline makes fries though. For some reason, it's cutting the potatoes on the pass back up the mandoline and I get these small cuts on the side of the fries. It's driving me crazy, but I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong.

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#10 James

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 10:20 PM

I read through a mandoline thread recently, and it seems that everyone recommends tossing the food clamp (claw guard, spike etc.) and using your hand instead, but protected by a metal (butcher's) glove. Maybe with the extra dexterity, you could avoid the backlash cut.

Edited by James, 08 February 2008 - 10:46 PM.

"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
-Mrs. Bridges, in Upstairs Downstairs

#11 Marlene

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 10:49 PM

Maybe. It's weird. I don't recall having this problem in the past, but the two times I have. I suppose I could resort to hand cutting them.
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#12 James

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Posted 08 February 2008 - 11:20 PM

I have rarely used my mandoline, but I'll definitely try it without the guard as soon as I can find a metal glove.
"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
-Mrs. Bridges, in Upstairs Downstairs

#13 Corgi Man

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 08:49 AM

I rarely use the pusher - or whatever it's called - on my mandoline. I use the mandoline very carefully, bare-handed and I do my best to make sure that the pressure exerted is not directly downward, but at the angle straight toward the blade and using the least amount of pressure possible when bringing the vegetable back away from the blade..

Edited by Corgi Man, 09 February 2008 - 08:51 AM.

Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


Lionel Bart - OLIVER!

#14 Guest_rocler_*

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 01:11 PM

James: they have the metal and cloth gloves, on Amazon.com. I have the metal glove and have had to get it fixed every once in awhile. If I hadn1t invested $100.00 in it I would go with the cloth one as it is cheaper to repair and replace.( The minimum each time is $35-$40)

#15 Guest_rocler_*

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 01:12 PM

Marleen what temp are you cooking your chicken at? And for how long?

#16 Marlene

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 11:07 PM

Marleen what temp are you cooking your chicken at? And for how long?



I heated the oil to 350. Because this chicken was pounded, it didnt' take as long so it was about 6 minutes per side more or less.
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#17 James

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 02:29 PM

Fried chicken today, from a bag of Halal legs.

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The very young chickens we get these days make the legs and thighs almost like white meat.

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Recently I have tried three different ways to fry, each of them in 1.5" oil in a small cast iron pot.
First was a coating of seasoned flour, very good but had the appearance of fried chicken skin,
next was chicken dipped in egg and milk, then flour; this was slightly better,
finally, as shown above, a double dipping of the egg/milk solution, and flour. I'll stay with this.

The shallow fry method is also great for onion rings, and single fry fries, in quantities for one or two persons.
"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
-Mrs. Bridges, in Upstairs Downstairs

#18 Corgi Man

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 02:42 PM

James, what was your oil temperature when frying? That has a great deal to do with flour adhesion and success of those 1st two methods.
Food, glorious food! / Hot sausage and mustard!
While we're in the mood -- / Cold jelly and custard!
Pease pudding and saveloy! / What next is the question?
Rich gentlemen have it, boys -- / In-di-gestion!


Lionel Bart - OLIVER!

#19 James

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 03:17 PM

It was 350. I preferred the double coating for appearance and crunchiness. The single flour coating looked insipid but tasted fine, no greasiness.
"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
-Mrs. Bridges, in Upstairs Downstairs

#20 Marlene

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Posted 30 April 2008 - 04:13 PM

James the crust looks good on your chicken. I've never used the double dipping method. Come to think of it, I haven't fried chicken in ages.
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Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.




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