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Ratatouille


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#1 James

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 01:02 AM

Here is an easy challenge, Ratatouille, using a bounty of autumn vegetables, including eggplant, zucchini, onions, and tomatoes.

Let's get this done by next weekend, or Sept. 23, so that we might get on with other autumn vegetarian gems, such as gazpacho, soupe au pistou, or salade nicoise.

A traditional ratatouille is not the same as the Keller version in the movie, but either will be fine.

Here is Jason and Rachel Perlow's excellent variation on Keller.

Too elaborate for me; I'll stay with a traditional Provencal recipe.
"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
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#2 Guest_artisan02_*

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 04:10 AM

Here is an easy challenge, Ratatouille, using a bounty of autumn vegetables, including eggplant, zucchini, onions, and tomatoes.

Let's get this done by next weekend, or Sept. 23, so that we might get on with other autumn vegetarian gems, such as gazpacho, soupe au pistou, or salade nicoise.

A traditional ratatouille is not the same as the Keller version in the movie, but either will be fine.

Here is Jason and Rachel Perlow's excellent variation on Keller.

Too elaborate for me; I'll stay with a traditional Provencal recipe.


The version I like is from one of Richard Olney's books. I think it is the French Menu Cookbook. I haven't tried too many versions, but of the ones I have, I like his the best.

Christine

#3 Corgi Man

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 01:08 PM

I've got like five recipes here. I love the Keller rendition's presentation. I thought it was beautiful and elegant in the movie. The other four recipes I have are of the chunky vegetables variety which I guess really is the authentic way to go - but it's visually not as appealing to me. Is there any other version that anyone finds visually appealing?

James, being a Spanish and Mexican soup, I don't think of gazpacho as a fall offering. To me it's for any time and place that's pretty warm.
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#4 James

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 01:28 PM

I've got like five recipes here. I love the Keller rendition's presentation. I thought it was beautiful and elegant in the movie. The other four recipes I have are of the chunky vegetables variety which I guess really is the authentic way to go - but it's visually not as appealing to me. Is there any other version that anyone finds visually appealing?

James, being a Spanish and Mexican soup, I don't think of gazpacho as a fall offering. To me it's for any time and place that's pretty warm.

You are right about gazpacho, but in northern climates there is a narrow window of opportunity to make it fresh from local ingredients, and I enjoy it more when everything in it is fresh, uncooked, and local.
"A stew boiled is a stew spoiled!"
-Mrs. Bridges, in Upstairs Downstairs

#5 Matthew Kayahara

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Posted 14 September 2008 - 05:33 PM

Tonight, I served the ratatouille that I had assembled yesterday and kept in the fridge overnight. I reheated it for 45 minutes at 300F before serving.

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I used Julia Child's recipe, because I think it's important to occasionally follow a standard recipe to the proverbial "T" in order to get a sense of why it's written the way it is, and how other recipes deviate from it. In this case, the key steps seem to have been peeling the eggplant and cooking the vegetables separately. I've certainly seen the latter before, and I think it really makes a difference to the final texture. Both I and my husband were really surprised at the depth of flavour the recipe produced. It was definitely a case of the whole being more than the sum of its parts. The vegetables here were zucchini (from a friend's garden), eggplant, tomatoes, green peppers, garlic (from the farmer's market) and onions and parsley (from the grocery store :o ). No mushrooms in sight, Marlene! :P

Edit: To add to my comment about depth of flavour, the thing that really stood out to me in this recipe is the near-total lack of herbs. I'm used to seeing at least bay leaves, or basil, or the generic "herbes de Provence" called for in ratatouille recipes, so I was expecting to be disappointed with a recipe that called only for parsley. But it was entirely satisfying nonetheless.

Edited by Matthew Kayahara, 14 September 2008 - 05:40 PM.

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#6 Marlene

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Posted 15 September 2008 - 08:16 AM

Very nice Matthew! Right now, my only window of opportunity to make it this week, might be Thursday. Otherwise, it's just going to have to wait till next week.
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